Community Garden

Teacher(s): John Linker, Mike Zurgable, Lynnea Roon
Main Contact: Mike Zurgable Email: mzurgable@kvilleps.org
Date: 11/16/11 Building: Kelloggsville High School Grade Level: 9-12 grades
Building: Southeast, West, East Elementary Schools Grade Level: 2-4 grades
First Trimester:      Second Trimester:      Third Trimester:
First Semester:      Second Semester: X
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Project Overview

Give a brief overview of the project you are planning.

We are designing an urban/community garden within our district to be utilized by grades K-12 along with collaboration with Family Network food pantry, Kelloggsville Church, and Kentwood Parks and Recreation.

 

Effective Practice: MEANINGFUL SERVICE

Service learning actively engages participants in meaningful and personally relevant service activities.

What community need will you address and how did you determine the need?

Our “theme” at KHS is Health and Fitness – Healthy Living.

As a group of staff/student leaders, we looked at our number of free/reduced lunch students as well as the visual appearance and eating habits of our student body and community, and concluded that offering the opportunity to grow healthy fruits and vegetables would help our community eat healthier.

What service will you provide to address the need?

We will be able to provide students and eventually community members the opportunity grow and harvest healthy, organic produce, as well as teach them how to grow a healthy garden.

 

Effective Practice: LINK TO CURRICULUM

Service learning is intentionally used as an instructional strategy to meet learning goals and/or content standards.

How is this project related to your curriculum?

A substantial portion of our biology curriculum addresses the concepts of designing experiments, identifying variables, data gathering, photosynthetic processes, limiting factors to growth of organisms, and transfer of genetic traits from generation to generation.

What are the educational goals? (Don’t forget Character Education and Career Preparation also!)

We believe that the garden will provide a real-world application of the processes and fundamentals of biology that we emphasize in the classroom. It will also provide a sense of ownership for our students that will likely aid in their knowledge.

 

Curriculum Crafter Connections   www.curriculumcrafter.com

Strand: BIO: (Genetics)
TLW: Compare/contrast how genetic material is passed from cell to cell by the processes of mitosis and meiosis and explain how these processes relate to asexual and/or sexual reproduction.

Strand: 02SCI: (Life Science)
TLW: Identify the needs of plants, describe the life cycle of flowering plants, and identify characteristics of plants that are passed from parents to young. (Gist: Needs Life Cycle and Heredity of Plants)

Strand: 03SCI: (Life Science)
TLW: Classify plants on the basis of observable physical characteristics and describe the function of plant parts. (Gist: Plants)

Strand: 04SCI: (Life Science)
TLW:   Explain how variations in physical characteristics can give organisms and advantage and how environmental changes can produce changes in food webs. (Gist: Adaptations and Food Webs)

State Standards and Benchmarks

List standards and benchmarks met by this project.

High School Standards

B1.1A Generate new questions that can be investigated in the laboratory or field.

B1.1B Evaluate the uncertainties or validity of scientific conclusions using an understanding or sources of measurement error, the challenges of controlling variables, accuracy of data analysis, logic of argument, logic of experimental design, and/or the dependence on underlying assumptions.

B1.1C Conduct scientific investigations using appropriate tools and techniques (selecting an instrument that measures the desired quantity – length, volume, weight, time interval, and temperature – with the appropriate level of precision).

B1.1D Identify patterns in data and relate them to theoretical models.

B1.1E Describe a reason for a given conclusion using evidence from an investigation.

B1.1f Predict what would happen if the variables, methods, or timing of an investigation were changed.

B1.1g Use empirical evidence to explain and critique the reasoning used to draw a scientific conclusion or explanation.

B1.1h Design and conduct a systematic scientific investigation that tests a hypothesis. Draws conclusions from data presented in charts or tables.

B2.5f Relate plant structures and functions to the process of photosynthesis and respiration.

B3.1 Photosynthesis and Respiration: Organisms acquire their energy directly or indirectly from sunlight. Plants capture the sun’s energy and use it to convert carbon dioxide and water to sugar and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. Through the process of cellular respiration, animals are able to release the energy stored in the molecules produced by plants and use it for cellular processes, producing carbon dioxide and water.

B3.1B Illustrate and describe the energy conservations that occur during photosynthesis and respiration. (also repeated in ecology)

B3.1C Recognize the equations for photosynthesis and respiration and identify the reactants and products for both. (also repeated in ecology)

B3.1f Summarize the process of photosynthesis.

B3.1 Photosynthesis and Respiration: Organisms acquire their energy directly or indirectly from sunlight. Plants capture the sun’s energy and use it to convert carbon dioxide and water to sugar and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. Through the process of cellular respiration, animals are able to release the energy stored in the molecules produced by plants and use it for cellular processes, producing carbon dioxide and water.

B3.1A Describe how organisms acquire energy directly or indirectly from sunlight.

B3.1B Illustrate and describe the energy conservations that occur during photosynthesis and respiration. (also repeated in ecology)

B3.1C Recognize the equations for photosynthesis and respiration and identify the reactants and products for both. (also repeated in ecology)

B3.1D Explain how living organisms gain and use mass through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.

B4.3A Compare and contrast the processes of cell division (mitosis and meiosis), particularly as those processes relate to production of new cells and to passing on genetic information between generations.

B4.4x Genetic Variation: Genetic variation is essential to biodiversity and the stability of a population. Genetic variation is ensured by the formation of gametes and their combination to form a zygote. Opportunities for genetic variation also occur during cell division when chromosomes exchange genetic material causing permanent changes in the DNA structure caused by the environment are another source of genetic variation.

 

Elementary Standards

SECOND GRADE: Organization of Living Things

K-7 Standard L.OL: Develop an understanding that plants and animals (including humans) have basic requirements for maintaining life which include the need for air, water, and a source of energy. Understand that all life forms can be classified as producers, consumers, or decomposers as they are all part of a global food chain where food/energy is supplied by plants which need light to produce food/energy. Develop an understanding that plants and animals can be classified by observable traits and physical characteristics. Understand that all living organisms are composed of cells and they exhibit cell growth and division. Understand that all plants and animals have a definite life cycle, body parts, and systems to perform specific life functions.

Life Science

• L.OL.E.1 Life Requirements- Organisms have basic needs. Animals and plants need air, water, and food. Plants also require light. Plants and animals use food as a source of energy and as a source of building material for growth and repair.

• L.OL.02.14 Identify the needs of plants.

• L.OL.E.2 Life Cycles- Plants and animals have life cycles. Both plants and animals begin life and develop into adults, reproduce, and eventually die. The details of this life cycle are different for different organisms.

• L.OL.02.22 Describe the life cycle of familiar flowering plants including the following stages: seed, plant, flower, and fruit.

Heredity

K-7 Standard L.HE: Develop an understanding that all life forms must reproduce to survive. Understand that characteristics of mature plants and animals may be inherited or acquired and that only inherited traits are passed on to their young. Understand that inherited traits can be influenced by changes in the environment and by genetics.

• L.HE.E.1 Observable Characteristics- Plants and animals share many, but not all, characteristics of their parents.

• L.HE.02.13 Identify characteristics of plants (for example: leaf shape, flower type, color, size) that are passed on from parents to young.

 

THIRD GRADE: Organization of Living Things

K-7 Standard L.OL: Develop an understanding that plants and animals (including humans) have basic requirements for maintaining life which include the need for air, water, and a source of energy. Understand that all life forms can be classified as producers, consumers, or decomposers as they are all part of a global food chain where food/energy is supplied by plants which need light to produce food/energy. Develop an understanding that plants and animals can be classified by observable traits and physical characteristics. Understand that all living organisms are composed of cells and they exhibit cell growth and division. Understand that all plants and animals have a definite life cycle, body parts, and systems to perform specific life functions.

• L.OL.E.3 Structures and Functions- Organisms have different structures that serve different functions in growth, survival, and reproduction.

• L.OL.03.31 Describe the function of the following plant parts: flower, stem, root, and leaf.

• L.OL.03.32 Identify and compare structures in animals used for controlling body temperature, support, movement, food-getting, and protection (for example: fur, wings, teeth, scales). *

• L.OL.E.4 Classification- Organisms can be classified on the basis of observable characteristics.

• L.OL.03.41 Classify plants on the basis of observable physical characteristics (roots, leaves, stems, and flowers).

• L.OL.03.42 Classify animals on the basis of observable physical characteristics (backbone, body coverings, limbs).

Evolution

K-7 Standard L.EV: Develop an understanding that plants and animals have observable parts and characteristics that help them survive and flourish in their environments. Understand that fossils provide evidence that life forms have changed over time and were influenced by changes in environmental conditions. Understand that life forms either change (evolve) over time or risk extinction due to environmental changes and describe how scientists identify the relatedness of various organisms based on similarities in anatomical features.

• L.EV.E.1 Environmental Adaptation- Different kinds of organisms have characteristics that help them to live in different environments.

• L.EV.03.11 Relate characteristics and functions of observable parts in a variety of plants that allow them to live in their environment (leaf shape, thorns, odor, color).

• L.EV.03.12 Relate characteristics and functions of observable body

• parts to the ability of animals to live in their environment (sharp teeth, claws, color, body coverings).

 

FOURTH GRADE

• L.OL.E.1 Life Requirements- Organisms have basic needs. Animals and plants need air, water, and food. Plants also require light. Plants and animals use food as a source of energy and as a source of building material for growth and repair.

• L.OL.04.15 Determine that plants require air, water, light, and a source of energy and building material for growth and repair.

• L.OL.04.16 Determine that animals require air, water, and a source of energy and building material for growth and repair.

Evolution

K-7 Standard L.EV: Develop an understanding that plants and animals have observable parts and characteristics that help them survive and flourish in their environments. Understand that fossils provide evidence that life forms have changed over time and were influenced by changes in environmental conditions. Understand that life forms either change (evolve) over time or risk extinction due to environmental changes and describe how scientists identify the relatedness of various organisms based on similarities in anatomical features.

• L.EV.E.2 Survival- Individuals of the same kind differ in their characteristics, and sometimes the differences give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing.

• L.EV.04.21 Identify individual differences (color, leg length, size, wing size, leaf shape) in organisms of the same kind.

• L.EV.04.22 Identify how variations in physical characteristics of individual organisms give them an advantage for survival and reproduction.

Ecosystems

K-7 Standard L.EC: Develop an understanding of the interdependence of the variety of populations, communities and ecosystems, including those in the Great Lakes region. Develop an understanding of different types of interdependence and that biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) factors affect the balance of an ecosystem. Understand that all organisms cause changes, some detrimental and others beneficial, in the environment where they live.

• L.EC.E.1 Interactions- Organisms interact in various ways including providing food and shelter to one another. Some interactions are helpful; others are harmful to the organism and other organisms.

• L.EC.04.11 Identify organisms as part of a food chain or food web.

• L.EC.E.2 Changed Environment Effects- When the environment changes, some plants and animals survive to reproduce; others die or move to new locations.

• L.EC.04.21 Explain how environmental changes can produce a change in the food web.

 

Effective Practice: REFLECTION

Service learning incorporates multiple challenging reflection activities that are ongoing and that prompt deep thinking and analysis about oneself and one’s relationship to society.

What form(s) of reflection will you use with the students to help them identify what they have learned and accomplished?

We hope to gather both quantitative and qualitative data over the growing season in order to observe the changes within the garden as a result of both natural and controlled variables.

We also hope to have several small group gatherings and “open” barbecues were the students and members of the community are able to socialize and discuss the garden. In addition, the relationship with the Family Network food pantry will bring community concerns to the forefront

 

Effective Practice: DIVERSITY

Service learning promotes understanding of diversity and mutual respect among all participants.

What types of diverse perspectives and experiences will be explored as part of your project?

(i.e.: cultural, generational, abilities/disabilities, learning styles, etc.)

The garden will be open to all grades K-12 as well as all ages and ethnicities within the community. We have a very diverse community, so possibly growing vegetables native to various countries may be an interesting selling point.

 

Effective Practice: YOUTH VOICE

Service learning provides youth with a strong voice in planning, implementing, and evaluating service learning experiences with guidance from adults.

How will students gain ownership of the project?

The entire project will be student driven; from the design/layout of the garden, to the construction of the garden, to the planting and harvesting of the vegetables. In order for this project to be sustainable and successful, it must be student led and developed with the eventual input from community members. Elementary Students planting seeds and plants in the garden will give interest in students observing their plants growing and changing. Students can visit their plants and help weed the garden.

 

Effective Practice: RECIPROCAL PARTNERSHIPS

Service learning partnerships are collaborative, mutually beneficial, and address community needs.

Who will you partner with for this project?

At this time, partners for this project include the Family Network, Kelloggsville Church, and Kentwood Park & Recreation

How will students benefit from this partnership?

Students will have an opportunity to work with professionals in the area of gardening/horticulture to expand their knowledge and understanding of nutrition, pollinating, etc. They can observe the life cycle of a plant, plant parts, adaptations of plants, and plant parts we use.

How will the partner benefit from this collaboration?

Partners will benefit two-fold:

• They will be helping promote their area of expertise and possibly gain life-long partners

• Our partners are short on manpower, which is something we hope to help in

 

Effective Practice: PROGRESS MONITORING

Service learning engages participants in an ongoing process to assess the quality of implementation and progress toward meeting specified goals, and uses results for improvement and sustainability.

How will you assess the student learning goals?

Student assessment will be based upon participation as well as weekly formative and summative assessments.

How will you assess your service goals?

Service goals will likely be based upon the community involvement. If the community frequents the garden, comes to “open-houses”, develops plots of their own, then the garden will have succeeded within the community. In addition, if the gardens at FN and KPR are able to grow and expand due to our influence, then that will be seen as success as well

 

Effective Practice: DURATION AND INTENSITY

Service learning has sufficient duration and intensity to address community needs and meet specified outcomes.

How will you prepare students for this experience?

This project will be student driven, however teachers will help direct and keep students on task, as well as bringing in “professionals” to help orchestrate the actual planting, maintenance, and harvesting of the garden.

What are some sample possible activities students might do as part of this project?

Activities may include: planting, weeding and harvesting days, field trip to the garden to observe plant parts and adaptions, 5 senses garden community lunches/barbecues with vegetables from garden, children’s garden area, farmer’s market stand, and send out flyers/pamphlets marketing the garden

 

SUSTAINABILITY

The three arms of sustainability are environmental stewardship, economic growth, and social progress. Think planet, profit, and people.

Describe how your project addresses the issue of sustainability?

Our project has changed from creating our own, large community garden to the creation of a smaller community garden here at the high school, in addition to aiding the gardens maintained at the Family Network and Kentwood Park & Rec. Since these gardens are already established, we are looking to have students and student groups aid in the maintenance and distribution of produce through the food pantry. As for our small garden at school, we hope to continue to aid the food distribution centers, but also focus on the academic aspects of its development as well. We are hoping to expand on the marketing and exposure of the gardens in order to increase community awareness and input. The smaller size garden at the high school will enable us to police it more efficiently as well as reduce the cost of the initial development which could then be transferred to later expansion.